Words For Pictures

bramblelamb asked: When you write for comics, hat kind of format do you use? Do you write it more along the lines of a narrative on a page, or do you do more of a script format. I've been meaning to practice all formats of writing and have been wondering if graphic novel writing was different in any way.

brianmichaelbendis:

It’s a very complicated question because unlike almost every other storytelling medium there is not a set format that is considered the professional format.

 the good news is you can create your own format but the bad news is you have to create your own format.

 I follow something similar to screenplays,  but going off in any direction that I want depending on the collaboration… and I use the final draft software to do it. I like it. in fact I love it. not everybody does. I do.

 the more involved answer, including many other writers answers, can be found in my recently published book  words for pictures… on sale now

http://www.amazon.com/Words-Pictures-Business-Writing-Graphic/dp/0770434355

Anonymous asked: have you ever had a heated argument with an editor?

brianmichaelbendis:

I am a big fan of the editor creator relationship and believe that a lot of good comes out of it. 90% of the time your editor has the book’s best interests at heart which means he or she has your best interest at heart. a great editor is doing everything they can to make you look great so you would be a fool not to listen to what they have to say.

  many editors work much longer hours than any creator ever will. and they don’t get to do it from the comfort of their own home. Tom and the gang stay well into the night getting books out on Friday. sometimes they are there so long it breaks my heart 

 but, and to no one’s surprise, not every editor is created equal. some are involved in some idiotic chess game that has nothing to do with making good comics and everything to do with whatever damage was done to them prior to you meeting them.

but that’s true with many people in life. it’s just annoying when that kind of thing is getting in your way of doing the work you want to do. I have been lucky and have nor had much of that in my life… but I would be remiss if I didn’t tell you that many of my friends have.

 I think one of the reasons I’ve been as successful as I have been is because I was lucky enough to have confident, professional, passionate editors backing me up.

 also I’m a terrible typist so if I ever got into an argument with an editor all they would have to do is send me a file of all the thousands of typos they has to fix for me over the years and that argument would be over.

oeming:

#Hercules #Electra cover with breakdowns 

In 1947, Life magazine decided to find out by challenging 10 contemporary comic strip artists to do just that – draw their characters with their eyes closed.

(Source: brianmichaelbendis)

spiral-shark asked: Bruh, your cityscapes are among the best in the business. I gotta ask, do you use any digital tools when you draw them such as SketchUp, or is it all through sheer willpower and rulers?

dustinweaver:

Hey, thanks!

I’ve answered this question before. Here’s what I said then:

I’ve never gotten into using Sketchup or any other 3-D modeling software. I know that a lot of artists use 3-D models to save time, but I’ve put a lot of effort into learning how to visualize and create this kind of stuff on my own. I’m just faster and more adept at drawing with a pencil and paper than I am at making 3-D models or even searching for the right ready-made model.

Another appeal of 3-D models is the fact that you can get things exactly and consistently right. This is an attractive idea for an illustrator who values realism. But I don’t mind getting things wrong. I actually believe that inaccuracies make an image more interesting.”

I’ll add that more and more I embrace the inaccuracies. I’m becoming less interested in precision. I’m even using a ruler less. There are a lot of places in my Edge of Spider-Verse issue where I’m just going on instinct.

Get inside her head. Get inside any character’s head and ask what they want in this scene. And if you work from the perspective of what they want, there’s not going to be any wrong answer. There’s going to be some boring answers, but none of them are going to be wrong. As long as she has agency, then you’re on the right track.

Kelly Sue DeConnick, in response to a question about writing “strong female characters” (via comicquotations)

fystoryboards:

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
Director: Joe Johnston
Artist: Rodolfo Damaggio 

fystoryboards:

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Director: Joe Johnston

Artist: Rodolfo Damaggio 

(via thezodiack)

freeglassart asked: You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

image

start to put on features

image

fix stuff

image

put on more stuff

image

fix stuff again

image

erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

image

2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

image

image

image

That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!